About Me

This blog is primarily geared toward staff at the zoos, aquariums, museums (ZAMs), and other conservation education organizations that are part of our growing global network. We aim to provide you with cutting edge, challenging, and creative information, ideas, and tools to become as effective as possible at communicating about and for conservation with your visitors and the public.

See our ongoing communications research, or join our growing network, at The Ocean Project's website.

January 25, 2013

Communicating Conservation: Weekly Resources and News



The Ocean Project posts weekly roundups of the key strategic ocean and climate communication resources we’ve been tweeting. Each link will be posted with a short description of what you’ll find—please feel free to ask us any questions! 

News & Discussion

Check out these timely articles and essays which may be helpful for framing various environmental issues, connecting with specific audiences, or otherwise informing your storytelling and communications.


  • Surprise: global warming ranks last as a public priority in the US… again.
    Only 28% say climate change should be a top priority for the president and Congress. Matthew Nisbet asks: Why and where do we go from here? To sum it way up: it’s the economy. Keith Kloor says that this hints that messaging connecting extreme weather to climate change/using a public health frame has not been effective. We note that while most climate communicators have been aggressively “betting on this meme” (as Kloor puts it), acknowledgement of the link in popular media, though significantly higher than last year, is still pretty minimal.

  • Climate Change is a Risky Business
    A survey conducted by the Carbon Disclosure Project and Accenture found that 70% of companies surveyed were concerned about climate change negatively impacting their business. The International Finance Corporation (the private sector arm of the World Bank Group) also notes that "Almost 80% of our clients say they find our environmental support is important to their business" and "... we’ve found there’s an 11% higher return from companies that demonstrate high environmental and social standards." 

Resources

 
Some studies, market research, toolkits, and strategies that may be helpful when communicating about conservation and climate change.


  • How is MY world warming?
    This interactive map from NewScientist shows exactly how your region has been feeling the heat from climate change.

January 18, 2013

Communicating Conservation: Weekly Resources and News



The Ocean Project posts weekly roundups of the key strategic ocean and climate communication resources we’ve been tweeting. Each link will be posted with a short description of what you’ll find—please feel free to ask us any questions!

Lots of good stuff this week, so let's dive in:
 

News & Discussion

Check out these timely articles and essays which may be helpful for framing various environmental issues, connecting with specific audiences, or otherwise informing your storytelling and communications.


  • Who is to blame for American climate inaction?
    A new report from Harvard scholar Theda Skocpol has caused a bit of a hullabaloo in the environmental community, particularly those who like to engage online. Super, super simplified: the report posits that environmental groups mistakenly put their money into “insider grand bargaining” in an effort to get cap-and-trade legislation passed, while underestimating the radical shift to the right many Republicans had made. Check out a summary here, interesting look forward from David Roberts of Grist here.

  •  Where oh where have the environmental journalists gone!
    You may have heard last week that the New York Times has dismantled its environment desk. Even worse, turns out there are only “about a dozen” environment reporters left at the Top 5 US papers. Inside Climate News lays out the situation, and it’s not pretty. As the consequences of environmental degradation get more serious, our quality news coverage of these issues is flagging. We at The Ocean Project are wondering: what implications could this have for trusted messengers, such as our zoo, aquarium, and museum partners?




Resources

Some studies, market research, toolkits, and strategies that may be helpful when communicating about conservation and climate change.



January 11, 2013

Communicating Conservation: Weekly Resources and News



The Ocean Project posts weekly roundups of the key strategic ocean and climate communication resources we’ve been tweeting. Each link will be posted with a short description of what you’ll find—please feel free to ask us any questions! 

News & Discussion

Check out these timely articles and essays which may be helpful for framing various environmental issues, connecting with specific audiences, or otherwise informing your storytelling and communications.


  • Which motivates: money or morals?
    A new Dutch study shows framing environmentally responsible behavior as a moral imperative is more effective than telling people it will save them money. The paper authors say the human desire to maintain a positive self-image by acting in line with internal moral standards can be an even stronger motivator than economic self-interest. Good study for improving conservation communication and your faith in human nature!

  • Explosive climate news, diminutive media coverage
    MediaMatters has done another interesting analysis of American TV climate coverage. They found that despite a record-breaking year in extreme weather—not to mention 2012 being the warmest year ever recorded—broadcast news barely mentioned climate change and declined to consult scientists on… basically anything.



Resources

Some studies, market research, toolkits, and strategies that may be helpful when communicating about conservation and climate change.



  • The Moral Roots of Environmental Attitudes
    An enlightening study about why Americans’ environmental attitudes are so politically polarized. Morality might be a great motivator for environmentally-friendly behavior, but which morals are you using to communicate the issues? How might they connect better for those with liberal or conservative tendencies? This sentence is a great take-home: “Re-framing pro-environmental rhetoric in terms of purity, a moral value resonating primarily among conservatives, largely eliminated the difference between liberals’ and conservatives’ environmental attitudes.” Via ClimateAccess.

January 3, 2013

Communicating Conservation: Weekly Resources and News




The Ocean Project posts weekly roundups of the key strategic ocean and climate communication resources we’ve been tweeting. Each link will be posted with a short description of what you’ll find—please feel free to ask us any questions! 


This week is going to be a larger post catching up on the biggest stories in the past month or so. Enjoy and Happy New Year!


News & Discussion


Check out these timely articles and essays which may be helpful for framing various environmental issues, connecting with specific audiences, or otherwise informing your storytelling and communications.



  • Seeing is Believing
    Could this be related? A new poll shows almost 4 out of 5 Americans believe global warming is occurring. The belief is growing especially quickly among those who doubt climate science but believe in their own personal experience of climate change. Good summary via ecoAffect.

  • Severe weather can change minds — some minds, anyway
    While we’re talking about severe weather and climate change, check out David Roberts’s piece on “motivated reasoning” — seeking out evidence that confirms existing beliefs; ignoring evidence that contradicts them.

  • Mixed Signals: More Americans Take Action, Fewer Say Actions Can Slow Climate Change
    A survey conducted by the Yale Project on Climate Change Communication and George Mason University’s Center for Climate Change Communication has shown more Americans are taking personal eco-friendly actions, but fewer think they actually have an effect. Good summaries from SightlineDaily and ClimateProgress on what these results means and implications for communicators.

  • See No Evil?
    Are the views that people express in opinion polls what they REALLY believe? Adam Corner looks at a new study for information about why there is a such a huge gap between people’s attitudes about the environment and their behavior. Via Talkingclimate.


Resources


Some new studies, market research, toolkits, and strategies that may be helpful when communicating about conservation and climate change.



  • People Say They Want Sustainable Consumption, But Do They Mean It?
    66% of survey respondents in Brazil, China, India, Germany, the U.K., and the U.S. agree "we need to consume a lot less to improve the environment for future generations," while 65% feel “a sense of responsibility to purchase products that are good for the environment and society." FastCoExist asks: What gives? Why aren’t we seeing more sustainable consumption?

  • Climate Coverage Falls Further in 2012
    Media coverage of climate change dropped by 2.4% in 2012 despite some big stories, such as drought and hurricane Sandy. Happy new year? There’s an upside though: stories which link climate change to phenomena such as sea level rise and extreme weather increase by 27% in 2012, an all-time high! Read the article here for a more in-depth look at what’s happening.